Have you ever been assigned to a client who had the budget approved, the solution identified, and the project initiated, and you were requested to manage the project? Have you ever worked on a project where you understood that the scope of the solution should have covered more than what the client had planned for? Have you joined a project only to find that key stakeholders are missing? How more hard could it be to manage a project without being in full control of its elements?

It reminds me of some statistics I came across a while ago. Being a BA/PM consultant becomes a real challenge when you know that you have only a 64% chance of successfully delivering your projects, according to PMI’s 2015 report Pulse of the Profession®: Capturing the Value of Project Management.

But why after all the maturity that took place in the project management and business analysis fields that projects still fail? I argue that many of the PMs and BAs who were sampled in the report are expert in their fields. This is clearly inferred from the same report where it shows that more than 60% of the surveyed organisations already fully understand value of project management, actively engage sponsors, and possess high alignment of projects to strategy. These organisations are expected to hire top notch BA/PMs and ensure continuous development of their resources.

If even expert BAs/PMs fail, then why there are some who managed to distinguish themselves from the rest of the crowd and associate the word “Great” or “Successful” to their title? Do they have the “magic wand” that turns any project they work on into a success story, or do they manage to see things other professionals are not able to, and manage to save themselves from losing the case? I am inclined to bias towards the second probability for obvious reasons 🙂

THE MISSING LINK!

Let’s have a deeper look into why projects fail and see what gaps have these great professionals managed to bridge. Statistics show that 47% of failed projects are a result of poor requirements management, according to PMI’s Pulse of the Profession: Requirements Management — A Core Competency for Project and Program Success.

Being an expert BA/PM will most probably grant you 64% of the success you need, but focusing on requirement management could increase your chances to 81%. This means you need to focus on factors that lie somewhere outside the boundaries of the simple project management realm. Yes! Outside the boundary of the project. Managing and controlling these outer factors is, in my opinion, the key to succeed in most of your projects.

But why to look outside the project? isn’t requirement management already a part of the project? Well, yes and no. Requirement management starts way before the project starts and forms the basis on which projects initiates, and this is where the risk comes from. Remember the scenario discussed at the beginning?

Back to the consultancy world, you usually join the client when the project is kicked off and you are required to deliver it “successfully”. This means that some sort of requirement management effort has already been taken place, and you have no control on the level of quality done to identify the business requirements behind the project and the value this initiative is expected to bring to the organisation.

If you proceed with your project as initially planned, you put your destiny on the hand of anonymous stakeholders who promoted an idea, formulated a project, and put you in front of the cannon. What happens if they have laid the wrong foundation for your project? For example, what if the client:
● Mixes desires with needs, and formulated a project around these desires without real business need?
● Articulates solutions as requirements and expect them to be delivered without proper assessment of their validity and effectiveness?
● Agreed to a solution that is not linked to business objectives?
● Has no business case or enough support from within the organisation?

If you don’t know where you’re going, any road will get you there.” – Lewis Carroll

In these cases, a project manager would be able to deliver the project according to the stated requirements but would put himself a potential prey to the 36% of failed projects and some reasons for that would be:

● In reality, projects are judged by the value they deliver to business rather than to what extent they match stated requirements.
● The ones who evaluate the project success are not necessarily the sponsor who initiated the project. These stakeholders might not have been identified as key stakeholders.
● The project delivers the intended value but it is not enough to realise the real benefit to the organisation.

MEET ORGANISATIONAL EXPECTATIONS!

The key to “great” project management and business analysis work is to meet the expectation, and by expectation I mean organisation’s one and not merely the sponsor’s. Remember that great BAs/PMs need to align project objectives to organisational ones, and this what grant them sustainability and success.

To meet expectation, you need to find and work on a complete solution that resolves client’s underlying problem, and not only smooths the symptoms that appear on the surface. Delivering the “stated” project might not give you the result you need because, at the end, the deliverables will be part of the new organisation’s capabilities, and you wouldn’t be sure if someone has already verified whether such deliverables would fit in the organisation smoothly.

SEEK SOLUTIONS NOT DELIVERABLES!

Successful projects manage to synergise deliverables with organisations’ environment. This means that project needs to take into account the organisation’s readiness to implement the solution successfully, integrate it into the day-2-day operations, and grant enough support to sustain its existence and realise its benefits.

This means that BAs/PMs should seek solutions that consist of some or all of the following:

TECHNOLOGY

Assess what and how technology is used and promoted inside the organisation. Verify that existing technology doesn’t fulfil the functionality requested. See if the new solution is in alignment to the technologies existing within the environment. Check contractual agreements and make sure the new solution is not limiting the organisation in expanding its business. Check if the technology used doesn’t need a change in other areas, like processes and organisational structuring.

PEOPLE

Assess what skill set is available within the organisation and whether it is enough to guarantee project success. Assess what development areas should be addressed to ensure value realisation. Verify that enough resources are available to get the job done. Assess how processes are setup around the solution and whether such processes are efficient. Process re-engineering is gold mine for boosting operational efficiency.

Organisational restructuring can also be part of a solution. Changing the way people are structured throughout the organisation could help streamline operations, increase efficiency, and ensure the right people own the right solution components.

CULTURE

Assess how internal culture impacts the work carried within the organisation. Understand how formal/informal politics/power impact and drive decision-making. Locate informal influencers and make sure they are content, if not satisfied, with your solution.

If a solution doesn’t require a cultural change, understanding how culture impacts the daily operations helps getting the right people engaged, and keeping the project on focus. Granting buy-in to your deliverables is key to project success.

THE CATCH!

When you join a project, don’t settle for what you are told to do. Maybe you are obliged to abide by the scope of the contract, but this should not hinder you from being on watch for what could cripple your project, continuously revising the givens and making sure what you are delivering constitutes a “complete solution”.

Be in search for external factors that grant you success. Influence decision makers to take corrective measures. If you are not able to change the course of the project, at least you know what you are missing, and maybe you could influence decision makers on the right time. Keeping key stakeholders aware of what a complete solution should be puts them on the same boat with you.

Don’t lose focus of the critical solution components: Technology, People, & Culture.

This time I highlight “what” I think you need to look for if you want to increase your chances of getting it right, wait for the next blog where I will discuss “why” and “how” looking into the bigger picture increases your chances of delivering great projects.



Wael BassionyPassionate about project management and the challenges faced by project managers. Over the last 16 years, Wael assumed several positions in IT and Telecom sectors, with specialisation in business analysis, project management, technical architecture, and leadership. He has hands-on experience in managing diverse types of projects, from small, short-term, to MM$, strategic ones. He holds a Master’s degree in Computing, a Master’s degree in Business Administration, and a number of technical certifications like PMP, CBAP, and ITIL.